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York's Councillors will debate how more wealth can be retained within the city when the full Council meets on Thursday this week.

Councillor Danny Myers will propose Labour's motion.
Councillor Danny Myers

Community wealth building seeks to use the purchasing power of larger organisations to support local businesses by procuring goods and services within a given area.

Drawing on examples of Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell’s New Economics events, Community Wealth building supports small and medium sized local businesses to build a sustainable local economy that challenges austerity and the traditional way of commissioning services.

The model is based on identifying what are known as ‘anchor’ institutions, and bringing them together with a view to spending more of their resources locally.

Commonly referred to as the ‘Preston model’ (after the local authority that first championed the new approach), the idea simply states that ‘anchor institutions’ should try to spend locally wherever possible.

Labour’s Councillor Danny Myers (pictured above right) will propose the motion.  He explains:

“The community wealth building model is one that really helps towns and cities to retain more of their wealth locally. Research shows that for every £1 spent by a small or medium sized organisation, 63p is re-spent locally. This figure drops to 40p for a multinational company.

“What we are looking for through our motion is to make a start and have some discussions with large organisations in the city about their procurement policies and what informs those policies. We’d like to think that companies like Nestle and Aviva, for example, would be supportive of measures that support York and the smaller businesses here that are the lifeblood of the local economy.

“Every spending decision made by the big companies, universities and public sector bodies in York has a sizeable knock on effect. We can create a more resilient local economy that rejects austerity by adopting this straight forward approach; it is both radical and responsible. In the most unequal city in the country outside of the South East, it is important that the local Council takes a leading role in building a city that doesn’t leave anyone behind.

“We also want to see some work carried out which identifies exactly where money is being spent so we understand the potential of community wealth building in York”.

York’s full council meeting takes place this Thursday at 6.30pm at the Citadel, Gillygate, where Labour will also be proposing a motion on inclusive growth and the gender pay gap in York.

Councillors to debate Labour's proposals for building Community Wealth

York's Councillors will debate how more wealth can be retained within the city when the full Council meets on Thursday this week. Councillor Danny Myers will propose Labour's motion.

Labour’s shadow environment spokesperson is calling for clarification on waste collection policy after a number of streets have reported non-collection of waste in the past week.

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Coun. Danny Myers queried the council’s response to missed bin collections in October last year after a number of properties in his ward and elsewhere did not see their refuse collected. At that time the council confirmed that its staff would only return to collect waste as soon as possible where a whole street’s waste had not been collected.

Coun. Myers said “Contrary to what it said in October, we now have the council stating that in the case of whole streets it won’t return to collect waste as soon as possible, but a month after it was last collected for those with wheelie bins. It’s quite understandable that residents are up in arms about not receiving waste collections, particularly as it’s one of very few frontline services everyone expects to receive”.

Coun. Myers said waste staff continue to do a great job, despite the challenges they experience with poor weather. But he says the issue of catch up collections when the weather improves is unclear. A number of streets have been hit in Acomb, Clifton, Bishophill, Huntington and Haxby in the past few days, further to press reports earlier this week of no waste collections taking place in Danebury Drive, Acomb.

Coun. Myers said the advice he received last year should be kept to, of collection ‘as soon as possible’ for whole streets or the council should come clean and say in the event of heavy snow, that some streets will temporarily move to monthly collections.

“It may be that there is simply insufficient capacity and money in the system to deliver this important frontline service when bad weather arrives”, said Coun. Myers. “But if this is the case, residents need to know the council’s policy so they can plan for it. Four weeks of refuse piling up on the street or on people’s properties doesn’t seem to me to reflect a commitment to frontline services by Liberal Democrats and Tories running York Council”.

Coun. Myers is writing to the council’s Liberal Democrat Executive Member for Waste to get clarification on the council’s latest policy, so there is transparency on what service the public can expect to receive in future.

Clarification called for on waste collections

Labour’s shadow environment spokesperson is calling for clarification on waste collection policy after a number of streets have reported non-collection of waste in the past week.

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Labour's candidate Kallum Taylor has become the newest member of City of York Coucil, elected with 50% of the votes cast in the Holgate by-election yesterday.

Speaking shortly after the result was announced, Kallum said:

"Tomorrow the real work begins. For me. For all of us. We have to keep making our voices heard so that more people hear them, and our voices become a shout. A shout of outrage at the way so many people in York are living. No. Not living. Existing. Existing because they’re working two or three jobs just to stay still. Existing because their home is unsuitable or affordable or both. Existing because they have loved ones who can’t get the care or medical attention they need. In a city like York it’s just not right that we have children who are hungry, families who are homeless and – behind closed doors and curtains – people isolated by austerity.

"I’ll not forget speaking to one of our senior citizens on the phone about the holes in Holly Bank Road. He thanked me for calling, said he’d vote for me, and then added that I was the first person he’d spoken to all day. It was 8pm at night. It’s not just our roads here in Holgate which are full of holes, it’s the policies of our council. Short-term, bodge it, patch it up policies with no vision and ambition for our city.

"We deserve better. We deserve much better.

"Now you have put your faith in me, I will take your passion, your energy and your hunger for change into the council chamber. I will work hard to deliver the policies that Holgate and this city deserves.

"Let’s inspire members, supporters and sympathisers across the city and out into the villages to win enough wards to turn York red next year. Only by delivering a Labour controlled council can we transform York into a city of hope and opportunity for the many.

"Tonight is the start of that change. Together we can deliver it."

Labour's Kallum Taylor wins Holgate by-election

Labour's candidate Kallum Taylor has become the newest member of City of York Coucil, elected with 50% of the votes cast in the Holgate by-election yesterday. Speaking shortly after the...

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